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Emmy Budd and the Hijacked Train

winner, 2010 Hollywood Book Festival
Best Children's Fiction





5.0 out of 5 stars WOW!, August 26, 2010
This review is from: Emmy Budd and the Hijacked Train (Kindle Edition)
By ami reader (fl) - See all my reviews


As a winner of the 2010 Hollywood Book Festival, I knew i would be reading something of taste, interest, and literary quality. But what I didn't know is I would find a gem of an adventure, filled with genuine characters, humorous dialogue and antics, and a page turning story that even at thirty five I would enjoy reading. As a teacher I know this story would be excellent for my classroom. Middle school kids would enjoy the story as well.
I hope others find this book and tell others about it. One of the best stories for kids, incorporating fun, detective work, and adventure. Like all the good old fashioned novels my parents grew up with. A turn away from the paranormal and dive into the real, problem solving, trouble making generations of past.

Reviewed by Ami Blackwelder
The author of The Hunted of 2060




4.0 out of 5 stars Emmy & TJ, August 24, 2010

By Barbara N. Hightower "Babslighthouse" (Taylors, SC USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Emmy Budd and the Hijacked Train (Kindle Edition)





Emily who is 12 meets TJ who is 13 he thinks she is ok for a girl. The two get on a train and have an adventure and solve the crime of the day. My two boys loved me reading this book to them and I found myself caught up in what was going to happen next. Reminds me of a good friend I had in school and the nice summer months to get in to trouble. Help other customers find the most helpful reviews



Emmy Budd had a great summer. What an adventure! I could imagine myself there with her.




The story is about two kids, Emmy and T.J. who sneak onto a train to visit Pittsburgh , but it gets hijacked. My favorite part was when the hijackers axed the train tracks and when T.J. and Emmy were hiding in the train. They actually managed to stop the hijackers.
T.J. and Emmy help to find the guy who got away by describing him. Someone recognized him and he was caught. The story was exciting! I liked it a lot. It was funny too, like when Emmy and T.J. flipped over in the canoe.
This book is good for boys and girls and grownups too.
Joey Alba , 9 years old




I loved the book "Emmy Bud and the Hijacked Train because" it was very fun to read and very interesting. I loved all the characters and thought that every single one had their own personality. In conclusion I loved the book and would give it five out of five stars.
From Kaylee Brownsberger (age 12)


I liked this book (Emmy Budd and the Hijacked Train). I think she should write another one.
Mia Garrett, age 9





Emmy who is 12 meets TJ who is 13 he thinks she is ok for a girl. The two get on a train and have an adventure and solve the crime of the day. My two boys loved me reading this book to them and I found myself caught up in what was going to happen next. Reminds me of a good friend I had in school and the nice summer months to get in to trouble.
Posted by ~ Babs ~ at 6:47 AM



               

Emmy Budd - Don't Look Now

Cheryl's Book Nook: Review Opp 3- Emmy Budd, Don't Look Now

Emmy Budd, Don't Look Now is the second of five mysteries contracted by Massachusetts publisher, Charles River Press. About the book: Emmy Budd, Don't Look Now by Jean Blasiar ISBN: 978-1936185148. Publisher: Charles River Press ... Cheryl's Book Nook - http://cherylsbooknook.blogspot.com/



Genre: Middle Grade Mystery
This is the second book in this mystery series. It was the first book I had read. It will definitely not be my last. This was a simple, yet well written book. It showcased two tweens, Emmy and TJ who are very curious about things that go on around their town. In Emmy Budd, Don't Look Now, Emmy finds herself involved in yet another mystery. While waiting for her friend TJ at the movies she makes a discovery. TJ is late and Emmy walks across the street to use the pay phone. Inside she finds a note left by someone. It reads, "Take change. Get drugs. Wait for Instructions." Emmy keeps the note and walks back across the street. When TJ shows up she points out the fact she is being watched. She is sure is has something to do with the note. She is also sure there is a mystery to be solved. This seems to be confirmed when the pharmacy suddenly blows up in the middle of the night. Now these two sleuths are on the trail collecting clues to figure out this mystery. A clean, fun mystery for the tweens in your life. I am proud to put this book on my shelf and call it a "good read".

Posted by Sandra Stiles at 6:15 AM 0 comments Links to this post



Emmy and TJ are at it again in this new book. A new summer has arrived and the kids are suspicious of a new person at the drugstore and a note they found in a phone booth. What will all this led to? One can only imagine with these two. My boys loved the 2nd book just as much as the first. It was fun to see what Emmy and TJ were going to get themselves into. Summers are always fun in Jerseyville. Makes you want to go there and have some fun yourself.

Posted by ~ Babs ~ at 11:34 AM



5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT WORK!, August 26, 2010
By ami reader (fl) - See all my reviews
I read the prequel to this book and here was my review of it: As a winner of the 2010 Hollywood Book Festival, I knew I would be reading something of taste, interest, and literary quality. But what I didn't know is I would find a gem of an adventure, filled with genuine characters, humorous dialogue and antics, and a page turning story that even at thirty five I would enjoy reading. As a teacher I know this story would be excellent for my classroom. Middle school kids would enjoy the story as well.

I hope others find this book and tell others about it. One of the best stories for kids, incorporating fun, detective work, and adventure. Like all the good old fashioned novels my parents grew up with. A turn away from the paranormal and dive into the real, problem solving, trouble making generations of past.

Reviewed by Ami Blackwelder
The author of The Hunted of 2060




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This book did not let me down either. Just as great, with different stories involving thinking, fun, innocent adventure, and good taste. Highly recommend. Help other customers find the most helpful reviews




4.0 out of 5 stars Emmy & TJ again :), August 24, 2010
By Barbara N. Hightower "Babslighthouse" (Taylors, SC USA) - See all my reviews

Emmy and TJ are at it again in this new book. A new summer has arrived and the kids are suspicious of a new person at the drugstore and a note they found in a phone booth. What will all this led to? One can only imagine with these two. My boys loved the 2nd book just as much as the first. It was fun to see what Emmy and TJ were going to get themselves into. Summers are always fun in Jerseyville. Makes you want to go there and have some fun yourself. Help other customers find the most helpful reviews




Emmy Budd - The Real Dog is Harry
Paperback: 128 pages Publisher: Charles River Press (December 14, 2010) Language: English ISBN-10: 1936185156 ISBN-13: 978-1936185153 Age Group: 8 and up

MOVEOVER NANCY DREW
Move over, Nancy Drew-Emmy Budd's here, to give you a run for your money, in another excellent mystery, the third one in Jean Blasiar's Emmy Budd Mystery series, She's again joined by her best friend, T.J. Blake, and his new pet, a scruffy stray dog he names Harry, because it looks to him like his Uncle Harry. There's excitement in the air right from the very first page of this mystery, with the tweens sitting in Jerry's Malt Shop discussing a gruesome find unearthed on the property of a local farmer in Jerseyville, Hank Turner: a human hand. Who does it belong to? How did it get there? And why is the land so important that land developer Andrew McDonald would go to any lengths to put up a tavern on the part of the Turner farm he bought from the bank, when Mr. Turner couldn't make a payment on time?
T.J. first sees Harry next to a statue of a man and his dog outside of the town's library, and he thinks Harry looks a lot like the statue of the dog. He gets Harry to follow him by tossing the dog peanuts to eat, as T.J. rides his bicycle. Harry catches every one of them in his mouth. The dog makes appearances at key moments in the entertaining novel, and Mr. McDonald makes comments here and there about a dog who used to live on the land he bought. It made me wonder exactly what the relationship was, if any, between Harry and the dog McDonald speaks about, and it made me want to keep reading to learn more.
It's summertime, and besides the usual summer fun of going to movies and riding bikes, Emmy and T.J. think about getting part-time jobs to earn some spending cash. When McDonald offers them both a job, they accept, though Emmy is reluctant, not liking Mr. McDonald's surface kindness and fake Southern accent that gets more pronounced as he gets madder or stressed. She believes his kindness is a cover, to get the townspeople on his side so they'll agree to his plans. Still, he says he'll pay them well for their work, so she agrees, thinking that he'll have them weeding his newly-purchased farmland.
Mr. McDonald, however, has other ideas. He talks down to the kids, calling them "young'uns," and has Emmy making lemonade for his hired hands. T.J is asked to run errands for whatever Emmy might need, like going into town to buy more lemons, when Emmy learns she has only two available. When Emmy's lemonade turns out to be too sour, and she's ran out of sugar, she substitutes what she believes to be honey she finds in a cabinet. The "honey," seems to pour too easily, but everyone comments about how good the lemonade tastes, including T.J. Little does Emmy realize, until T.J. starts acting strangely, and the hired hands start getting loud and begin fighting, that it wasn't honey she added, but something alcoholic. She doesn't like her role in the whole thing, but feels like she and T.J. were used by McDonald, like he seems to use everyone. They decide to quit working for Mr. McDonald, and T.J.'s mom, who works at a diner, lets them help her there to earn some spending money.
The mystery deepens when Emmy overhears a couple of McDonald's workers talking about either a person or a place called "Brawley." Emmy is sure that the name has something important to do with why Mr. McDonald is so interested in building a tavern on the old Turner land, whose bones were found there, and why Mr. McDonald refuses to sell it to the father of another friend of hers, who tells McDonald he'll pay double the price McDonald did, and that he wants to make a cemetery there. But, how will she find out what Brawley means, without alerting McDonald that she's closing in on learning what he's up to?
The Real Dog is Harry is an exciting, suspenseful novel about Emmy Budd's and her friend, T.J. Blake's, involvement in what might be their most challenging case yet! The first two novels in the series by Jean Blasiar are Emmy Budd and the Hijacked Train and Emmy Budd Vol. 2 - Don't Look Now. They're also great, so I recommend you read them, too, but the good news is that you don't have to have read them to understand what's happening in and enjoy the third book, The Real Dog is Harry. If you're into cool, fun, and suspenseful mysteries, then I'd highly recommend this book and the rest of the novels in the Emmy Budd Mystery series to you!
Reviewed by Douglas R. Cobb for http://www.bestsellersworld.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Douglas_Cobb



Review by Bab's World of Book Reviews
I love this series even at my age. My boys like it as well. They always want to see what kind of trouble Emmy and TJ can get into, then see how they solve the situations. When Emmy hears about the hand she gets all queasy and TJ has to laugh at her. Then the real story begins, who does the hand belong to? Between figuring that idea out, helping their friend Hank, who owns the Land the developer wants to build on, working at the dinner for TJ's mom, they end up finding the dog they call Harry or I should say he ends up finding them. There are some funny parts along the way and the story grabs you for the beginning and you do not want to put the book down. This is a great gift idea of the holidays.
Emmy is a charming girl that any of the girl readers will enjoy reading about and the boys will like TJ and his playfull ways.
This is a series but you can read as a stand-alone story.



Emmy Budd and the Scarlet Scarf
July 2011
Review by Bab's World of Book Reviews
I loved it like I have loved all the other Emmy Budd books. Emmy’s mom bought a one of a kind scarf from Claire’s. When she got home she could not find it. She could not remember where she put it. While Emmy and TJ were at the movies someone stoled Emmy’s bike. She called her dad and they went to the police. About an hour later the police had her bike and it was returned. That evening Emmy’s mom and dad are out for their anniversary and see another woman wearing the one of a kind scarf, which was missing. Little things like this started happening and the person is getting braver by the day. With the help of an old friend of Emmy’s dad they start to investigate to see what is going on or so they think.
I adore Jean’s writing style. The mystery in this book keeps you guessing up until the end. I did not figure out what was going on until almost the very end. The twists in the book are exactly in the right spots to help keep you on and off your toes.
The kids and I love this series and always enjoy when a new book comes out. This is a must read from your 7 year old on up to adult. I can’t brag enough about this book.





ISBN: 1-936185-41-5
Release: July 2011

Emmy Budd and the Gypsies
December, 2011

       "I read one of your series called Emmy Budd.  I really liked it.  My favorite character was Emmy because she was adventurous, brave and curious."
  Samantha Dalgewicz

  "Emmy is my hero. I would have liked to seen the Captain's face when she stared him down. I couldn't stop laughing."
  Logan Hightower, age 8

  "I can't wait to read the next Emmy Budd."
  Lucy Howell

  "I really like the adventure and mystery in these books. I think every one should read them."
Savannah Miller

Downtown Cowboy

Young Brady Johnson, called the Downtown Cowboy by his friends, lives with his widowed mother in the tenement district of a mid-western city. A favorite haunt of Brady’s is the city dump, one block away, where he spends most of his time rummaging through garbage, especially the garbage dumped on Thursdays from “uptown”. One Thursday morning Brady discovers a diary written by a very depressed boy about his age. Hoping for a reward, Brady takes some of the money he has saved and rides the bus “uptown” to see if he can find the boy and return the diary. Follow Brady to the conclusion of this surprising uptown journey and into a world, he is sure, he will never belong.

SAVANT PUBLISHING
July 2010 - SAVANT PUBLISHING Announces Release of Jean Blasiar's Coming-of-Age Novel "Poor Rich" Read more

Poor Rich - July 2010

Poor Rich was not my style, August 8, 2010

By BookSwarm "The Queen Bee" (South Carolina) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Poor Rich (Paperback)
Final Grade: 80/C

REVIEW: Puberty comes to Rich (don't call me Richie) Cameron and "cures" him of his asthma and allergies. Suddenly he's able to play basketball, join the swim team, and even participate in PE, all without the need to use his rescue inhaler constantly. But he still feels like an outcast, like no one likes him or understands him. The thing is, he really connects with people and understands them far better than he believes. He has a distinct lack of self-confidence.

As much as I wanted to connect with Rich, I just couldn't. He is so self-absorbed, trapped in his asthmatic-induced world, he can't see the impact he has on those around him. And, because the book is written in first person, his is the only voice, leaving no chance to connect with any of the other characters. In addition to that, the other characters move in and out of the scenes so quickly, it's hard to know much about them at all. The way the story is written, I felt like I was reading scenes that never seemed to connect or tell the whole story.

The part one of the book tells Rich's story of what he did after learning he wasn't as sick as he'd been before. While the dialogue is easy to read, there are some expressions and turns of phrases that just aren't current. For example, the basketball coach is trying to get the new kid, Edward, to play but Edward says he can't, he has to work after school. "Things change," he [the coach] says, Cagney to Edward G. Robinson. Um, huh? I thought of Cagney & Lacey at first (though that's still way outdated). But, no, this is a reference to James Cagney, who made a movie with Edward G. Robinson back in 1931 (yeah, I totally googled that one.).

The second half of the book is a collection of Rich's essays that he wrote while in therapy. That's when I decided this book was probably way too "literary" for me (plus, I felt like I was reading my students' essays. Uhg. Not ready for that yet.). Without a connection to any of the characters and a flat plot, this book was just not my style. Help other customers find the most helpful reviews



An excellent set of short stories that are "written" by an unusual boy, August 3, 2010
By Charles Ashbacher "(cashbacher@yahoo.com)" (Marion, Iowa United States(cashbacher@yahoo.com)) - See all my reviews

Rich Cameron is an unusual child, he suffers from such intense and varied allergies that he is extremely sheltered and heavily medicated. For example, even with the medication he cannot set foot inside a gymnasium without experiencing a severe reaction. He has never participated in anything in the area of physical activity but he is an extremely talented writer. His English teacher is taking advantage of his talents to have Rich tutor some of the other students in his creative writing class. Despite the workload, it is an advantage for Rich because it is his only productive social interaction and it includes helping girls.

Suddenly and completely unexpectedly, when Rich must walk across the gym floor he is astounded when he is able to do so without having to puff desperately on his inhaler. Furthermore, all of his other allergies have also vanished. This newfound freedom has disadvantages; he now is playing sports where he has absolutely no clue what he should do and he must come out of what was a predictable and comfortable shell.

The first segment of the book is Rich describing his life to date, even setting aside the allergies it has been most unusual. His father discovered that he was gay and divorced his mother to create a domestic partnership with another man that is a good friend to Rich. Rich's mother has remarried to a very homophobic man and his mother is a bit on the overprotective side. Rich is seeing an intelligent psychiatrist and there is a former nanny named Gia that provides the sex interest. Gia is only a few years older than Rich and is the one that explained the sexual world to him.

Without a doubt the best part of the book is the second section that is a set of short stories written by Rich. They cover some very sensitive themes, for example the first one is "The Pedophile Next Door", where the man that moved in next door largely kept to himself and all was peaceful until it was discovered that he was a registered sex offender. An appropriate title could have been "The Loneliness of the Sex Offender." It is a simple and sensitive story about someone trying to re-integrate into society and just be a person with a life. Another of these excellent stories is about Rich's near sexual encounter with Gia and has a great deal of understated sexual tension. If there is such a category as gentle erotica for teenage boys, then this story is in it. It seems that nearly every young boy, myself included, knew a girl a few years older that they regularly fantasized about being the opposite in their first sexual experience.



By Amos Lassen (Little Rock, Arkansas) - See all my reviews

This review is from: Poor Rich (Paperback)

Blasiar, Jean. "Poor Rich", Savant Books, 2010.
Finding a Strange New World
"Poor Rich" is the story of Rich Cameron an asthmatic and reclusive adolescent genius who is satisfied with the life he lives, sheltered away from the world. Then one day the allergies he has had since he was a child suddenly stop bothering him and he enters a strange new world with the help of a psychiatrist and a parrot named U2. You can just imagine what it was like for Rich to enter the world, He was raised by a gay father for a while and then a homophobic stepfather and he had been hiding behind his asthma. Once he is allergy free he has to leave nerdom behind him and enter the real world. Adolescence is a crazy time anyway for most but for Rich it was a completely new experience. Like everyone else now Rich must face the world which can be mean and hard and even more so if one has not been part of it.


Jean Blasiar gives us a story filled with detail and compassion as well with a twist and some very clever wit. I had a lot of fun reading this and I am sure that most readers will feel the same way.



Excellent Summer Read, August 2, 2010
By ami reader (fl) - See all my reviews

I was sent this book for an honest review. I must say I loved the book! The author Jean Blasiar certainly has a way with words. Details rang true, descriptions that did not bog down the wording. Dialogue that sounded genuine and a few embedded letters adding to the story.

With a hint of humor, and an interesting main character who is a recluse genius, he must venture off in the real world when his allergies clear up. Very interesting and page turning adventure. If you enjoyed stories like Rainman, crazy love, and such, you may like this kind of story. I certainty was entertained while educated and would read more of this author.

A tale really about all people, anyone can relate to the prose.
Recommended and reviewed by Ami Blackwelder, author of The Hunted of 2060
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Now Available
Richer (2011)
by Jean Blasiar
292 pp. 5.25" x 8" Softcover
ISBN 978-0-9829987-2-4

Reviewed by Ami Blackwelder, author of The shifters of 2040 and The Hunted of 2060


Richer, a novel by author Jean Blasiar is a follow up to Poor Rich. Following the life of teenager Rich Cameron, the reader is immediately drawn into the main characters woes from page one. Gia (the girl who left him), U2 (his bad-mouthed parrot), Mom, and by chapter two we meet up with Dad. Parents divorced, more woe.

The life of Rich Cameron is a complicated one, because he suffers from a nervous condition as a result of his high intelligence. As a teacher and writer, I could emphasize with Rich Cameron. Kids are often ostracized for being different and I understood his complexities.

This is a gem of a book for a student who is feeling misplaced, or that because of some gift he/she doesn't fit in. I think Jean would do the school system well if she wrote up a lesson plan for Poor Rich and Richer that teachers could follow in the classroom. I'd be willing to bet teachers would read the book in class and even have students buy it if they had a lesson plan to follow.

With enough twists and turns to keep you turning the pages, and written by a deftly writing talent, I recommend this book to students, teenagers, teachers, and parents! Or even adults looking for something of literary quality to read that is not mainstream.




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